Face of medieval man reconstructed from 600-year-old skull dug up in Scotland

A group of archaeologists and researchers announced Tuesday that they recreated the face of a medieval man whose remains were dug up in a Scotland museum four years ago.
The man, who researchers identified as Skeleton 125, was found among 60 skeletons and 4,272 bone fragments on the site of the Aberdeen Art Gallery in Aberdeen, Scotland amid construction of a new development on the site.

Washington gets nearly $5.3 million to test backlogged rape kits

Washington State Patrol got a grant for $1,857,667 to increase crime lab capacity, including equipping a new DNA section in the Vancouver crime lab. State patrol also got a grant for $920,921 that will digitize and store about 480,000 case records so they can be more easily accessed by investigators. Those records are currently archived in off-site storage.

Police were cracking cold cases with a DNA website. Then the fine print changed.

In April 2018, California authorities revealed that they’d used a novel investigative technique to arrest a man they called the Golden State Killer, a serial murderer who’d escaped capture for decades.
For the first time, police had submitted DNA from a crime scene into a consumer DNA database, where information about distant relatives helped them identify a suspect.
The announcement kindled a revolution in forensics that has since helped solve more than 50 rapes and homicides in 29 states.

Maloney Hails Passage of Debbie Smith Reauthorization Act

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, the House of Representatives passed Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney’s (D-NY) H.R. 777 – Debbie Smith Reauthorization Act of 2019. This bipartisan bill was introduced with Congresswoman Ann Wagner (R-MO) in January.

Nome has test results from sex assault kits, some more than 10 years old. Now it must find a way to investigate the cases.

One hundred and fourteen sexual assault kits have been tested and returned to Nome Police Department through the Alaska Crime Lab Capital Fund Project.
Many of the returned kits need some type of investigation, but right now NPD said they don’t have the experienced investigators required to do that.

DNA solves woman’s 1984 killing

But authorities used DNA evidence and forensic genealogy to identify her killer as Phillip Cross, who was 21 at the time. Cross died of a drug overdose in 2012.
Authorities linked the suspect through a DNA match of the suspect’s second cousin.

US taking step to require DNA of asylum-seekers

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is planning to collect DNA samples from asylum-seekers and other migrants detained by immigration officials and will add the information to a massive FBI database used by law enforcement hunting for criminals, a Justice Department official said.

Man pleads guilty to 2016 Alexandria rape solved using forensic genealogy

Bjerke was one of the first offenders identified in Virginia using forensic genealogy, an increasingly common technique for solving cold cases where police have little evidence beyond DNA. Bjerke had no criminal history, and so his DNA was in no law enforcement database. But sperm left at the crime scene matched with relatives of Bjerke who had uploaded their genetic information to public genealogy databases.

Man forced to pay child support despite DNA test proving he is not the father

Sinawa says he’s currently representing himself since he’s strapped for money and cautiously awaiting the next court date. He is working to once again disestablish his paternity from the child.

Wisconsin Lawmakers Consider Sexual Assault Victims Bill Of Rights

Wisconsin would adopt a new bill of rights for sexual assault victims under a proposal in the state Legislature.
Under the bill, victims of sexual assault would be guaranteed a number of rights, including the right to choose whether or not to undergo a forensic examination and the right to be notified before any evidence from that examination is destroyed.
The rights would be afforded in addition to those already guaranteed under state law for all crime victims.

Manitoba man sues provincial government for wrongful conviction and imprisonment in teen girl’s death

Manitoba prosecutors relied on “scientifically corrupt” DNA evidence to wrongly convict a man in a decades-old child murder, and kept him behind bars even after they were given overwhelming evidence that it was faulty, his lawyers say in an $8.5-million lawsuit against the province, the individual prosecutors and Winnipeg police.

I was writing about colonial America’s first enslaved Africans.

USA TODAY-The search for one woman’s family led a reporter to find her own roots using oral history, archives and DNA tests. It also led to stunning results.

The DNA of Murder with Paul Holes

With unprecedented access to crime scene photographs, case files and evidence, Holes investigates each crime utilizing his unique forensic and behavioral skillset. Hoping to zero in on the profile of the perpetrator, he lends his expertise in the latest technological advancements from familial and genetic genealogy to latent fingerprint and DNA phenotyping, the process of predicting physical appearance from DNA.

A Fourth Amendment Framework for Voiceprint Database Searches

Voiceprint technology works by first securing an initial recording of a known individual. For example, a prison may ask an incarcerated individual to provide a sample voice recording; a bank may record a client once the client goes through an alternate verification process. The technology then analyzes hundreds of components of that user’s voice and creates a voiceprint, which is stored in a database and associated with that individual. When subsequent calls are made, the technology creates a new voiceprint and compares that to the known voiceprint to confirm the caller’s identity. This matching process parallels that of other biometric verification processes such as DNA and fingerprint matching.

Kansas Authorities Announce Elimination Of 2,200 Rape Kit Backlog

Topeka, Kansas authorities announced Thursday that they are close to completing testing on a backlog of over two thousand rape kits that had gone unprocessed for years, according to the Associated Press.
According to the Kansas Bureau of Investigation (KBI), 2,000 of the kits have already been tested, with the remaining 235 to be tested by the end of the month. Some kits date back decades, authorities announced Tuesday.