5-year-old girl testifies against Ohio man accused of rape

WOOSTER — The trial of a Wooster man accused of raping a 5-year-old girl began Monday, with the mother of the victim maintaining that she does not believe the defendant, Anthony Bryant, harmed her daughter.

DNA Doe Project: Two retired California doctors help detectives solve cold cases using forensic DNA

LOS ANGELES, CA (FOX 11) – Two retired doctors are using DNA and genealogy to identify victims and unmask killers from the comfort of their own homes.
Colleen Fitzpatrick lives in Orange County and Margaret Press lives in Sonoma County, but the two of them are solving cold cases at an impressive rate.

Scientists Extract DNA From Seabiscuit’s Hooves

Eighty years ago, the horse famously trounced Triple Crown winner War Admiral. Did genetics make him an unlikely success?

DNA, fingerprint match: How FBI uncovered bomb suspect’s ID

WASHINGTON — In the hours before his arrest, as federal authorities zeroed in and secretly accumulated evidence, Cesar Sayoc was in his element: spinning classic and Top 40 hits in a nightclub where he’d found work as a DJ in the last two months.
As he entertained patrons from a dimly lit booth overlooking a stage of dancers at the Ultra Gentlemen’s Club, where Halloween decorations hung in anticipation of a costume party, he could not have known that investigators that very evening were capitalizing on his own mistakes to build a case against him.
He almost certainly had no idea that lab technicians had linked DNA on two pipe bomb packages he was accused of sending prominent Democrats to a sample of on file with Florida state authorities. Or that a fingerprint match had turned up on a separate mailing the authorities say he sent.

Call For Workshops

The ISHI Program Committee invites interested parties to submit workshop proposals for either full or half-day workshops to be held in conjunction with the 30th International Symposium on Human Identification. Workshops will be scheduled for Sunday, September 22, Monday, September 23 or Thursday, September 26, 2019.
All proposals will be reviewed by committee and selected based on perceived interest to the forensic community. Workshop proposals should be non-commercial and focused on educating forensic scientists on topics that will improve their technical, legal or policy knowledge.
Submit your proposal by January 11, 2019
Submit Now

Why DNA tests for Indigenous heritage mean different things in Australia and the US

Last week, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren released a video strongly suggesting two things: she is running for US president in 2020, and she has Native American ancestry.
The second claim was apparently confirmed by the results of a DNA test, which compared genetic data from Warren’s whole genome with that from people of known Central and South American ancestry.
Warren has come under fire from both sides of US politics for releasing her genomic information. Many have questioned the veracity of the test. Others have said that even if Warren does have Native American ancestry, that doesn’t make her Native American.

Who am I? Hunt for heritage drives Chinese to DNA tests

A combination of factors—a lack of formal records or destruction during China’s wars and the Cultural Revolution—have meant there are few ways for Chinese to trace their genealogy in the ethnically diverse country.
But with a growing middle-class, an increasing number are now keen on tracing their roots, and DNA testing companies are cashing in.
China’s DNA sequencing market was worth about 7.2 billion yuan ($1.05 billion) last year and is forecast to grow to 18.3 billion yuan in 2022, according to estimates by Beijing-based CCID Consulting.

DNA leads to arrest in 35-year-old Florida rape case

ORLANDO, Fla. — A man has been arrested in a rape case that sat unsolved for nearly four decades until the case’s DNA evidence was tested last year.

Michigan Court of Appeals Affirms STRmix Use, Lower Court Decision in State v Muhammad Case

Court concludes that the trial court “did not abuse its discretion in admitting the results” from DNA testing.

New Tools for Law Enforcement Being Created at Rutgers University–Camden

CAMDEN, N.J. -Crime scenes might yield DNA evidence to help reveal the identity of a criminal, but law enforcement investigators often are stymied in that determination because genetic material collected can come from more than one person.
A Rutgers University–Camden researcher is working to create new scientific approaches to forensics that may provide new crime-solving tools for law enforcement agencies.

IARPA Wants to Identify Criminals From Their Skin Cells

The goal isn’t to replace DNA analysis but rather add another technology to forensic analysts’ toolbox.

DNA Evidence Exonerates a Man of Murder After 20 Years in Prison

The headlines are disturbingly familiar: A person, usually male and often black, who has spent a substantial stretch of his life behind bars is freed after DNA evidence shows that he is innocent.
That was the case for Horace Roberts, 60, who was released from a California prison on Oct. 3 after DNA evidence exonerated him in the 1998 killing of his former girlfriend and co-worker.

The culprit’s name remains unknown. But he licked a stamp, and now his DNA stands indicted

There was just enough spit on the back of the 9-cent stamp to piece together the identity of the person who licked it. Everything except for his name.

How an Unlikely Family History Website Transformed Cold Case Investigations

Fifteen murder and sexual assault cases have been solved since April with a single genealogy website. This is how GEDmatch went from a casual side project to a revolutionary tool.

New DNA search helps crack Wisconsin murder

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) — Many unsolved crimes are missing one key piece of evidence. Another look at a strand of DNA could lead to the match needed to crack a case.
The State Crime Lab in Madison is now looking for more genetic markers when they analyze DNA. The goal: find a true match.
“We made that little modification in the search parameters which allows us to now see potentially more matches,” says Jenn Naugle, Deputy Director, Wisconsin Crime Lab Bureau.