Category Archives: New ID Technologies

New tool predicts eye, hair and skin color from a DNA sample of an unidentified individual

INDIANAPOLIS – An international team, led by scientists from the School of Science at IUPUI and Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam in the Netherlands, has developed a novel tool to accurately predict eye, hair and skin color from human biological material — even a small DNA sample — left, for example, at a crime scene or obtained from archeological remains. This all-in-one pigmentation profile tool provides a physical description of the person in a way that has not previously been possible by generating all three pigment traits together using a freely available webtool.

Washington State Deploys STACS DNA’s Track-Kit Sexual Assault Kit Tracking System

“We are thrilled to be rolling-out Track-Kit in the state of Washington, which is leading the way in tracking SAKs,” said Jocelyn Tremblay, President and COO, STACS DNA. “For the past four years, we’ve been working with state agencies and sexual assault task forces across the United States so that we would be prepared with a complete, off-the-shelf, turnkey system that will be deployed quickly and be easy for everyone to use.”

Local detectives look to new DNA technology to solve

SEATTLE – Washington investigators are turning to DNA technology to find new leads in unsolved murder cases.
At the annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in Seattle last week, developers from all over the nation showed off tools that promise to cut down the time it takes to solve a crime.

Army Deploys Biometrics System to Iraq

Army researchers are providing a system to forces in Iraq that provides contact-free fingerprint, facial recognition and iris detection capabilities. The system has been deployed to an undisclosed location as part of a joint urgent operational need and will be assessed for about 30 days to determine if it might be used elsewhere.

Courting Change: a Fresh Take on DNA Profiling

Y chromosome profiling, important in sexual assault cases, can often be presented incorrectly in court. New math could help by taking the ambiguity out of the equation.

App Developers Hope To Battle Rape Kit Backlog With NowtRKit

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — A group of engineers are using their technology to help end the backlog of rape kits — with an app.

Fighting Wildlife Crime With Forensic Genetics

Protecting the world’s endangered wildlife is a major law enforcement challenge. Poachers, often paid by organized criminal networks, have vast wilderness areas in which to operate. Rangers and police are frequently overstretched and sometimes outgunned. Even when arrests occur, cases can be difficult to prove and successful prosecutions are rare. But new tools, ranging from drones to game theory, are starting to make progress. Now the techniques of forensic genetics used in human crime scene analysis are entering the fray.

Sleuth who can crack a murder with blood taken from mosquitoes

NAGOYA–It’s the classic midsummer night’s whodunit murder mystery: A locked room, a corpse, a dead mosquito, no witnesses, and no obvious clues.
But Yuji Hiroshige, a senior researcher at the crime lab of the Nagoya prefectural police here, reckons such a case is eminently solvable.
Just extract the blood from the mosquito, run a DNA test and bingo, a match can be found–unless, of course, the insect bit the victim, not the perpetrator of the crime.
As Sherlock Holmes would say, “Elementary, my dear Watson.”

SigNature® DNA Evidence by Applied DNA Used to Convict Criminal in Cash-in-Transit Robbery

STONY BROOK, N.Y.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Applied DNA Sciences, Inc. ( NASDAQ: APDN, “Applied DNA”), today announced that SigNature® DNA evidence has helped to convict a member of an Irish organized crime group involved in a Cash in Transit (CiT) robbery.
“This is the first criminal conviction in Ireland secured using SigNature DNA evidence, and should act as a warning to any other criminals who may be considering a cash-in-transit attack. Our ever-increasing tally has now reached 115 criminals convicted for 545 years of jail time,” commented Tony Benson, Applied DNA’s Managing Director for EMEA.

Akron’s NicheVision develops crime-fighting DNA analysis software for law enforcement

AKRON, Ohio – Nestled in the shadows of the city’s former rubber industry, forensic software development company NicheVision seeks to change how DNA is analyzed by law enforcement.

Plano PD’s new DNA testing tool weeds out bad samples, cuts wait time for results from months to minutes

The Plano Police Department is testing a new tool that’s expected to help solve crimes faster and save money on forensic testing.
Due to the backlog at crime labs across the country, wait times for DNA results in criminal investigations can be crippling. And there’s no guarantee that items sent for testing will return usable DNA profiles. As much as half of all evidence submitted to crime labs yields no DNA at all.

Police, county use rapid DNA system to confirm suspect in Carlisle homicide

Police are crediting the cooperation of citizens, law enforcement and aid from new technology in catching the man they say shot and killed 35-year-old Rhyhiem Hodge Sunday during a robbery in Carlisle.

The Future of the CYP2D6 Molecular Autopsy using Tramadol-Exposed Individuals

Molecular autopsy describes the use of genetic data to aid in determining cause and/or manner of death in situations where traditional medico-legal autopsy is undetermined. Seminal papers in this field have used genetic variation in the cytochrome p450 family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) locus to classify four main metabolizer phenotypes: poor, intermediate, extensive, and ultrarapid.

New DNA swab to combat sexual violence in war zones

Scientists have created a self-testing DNA swab that could make it much easier to prosecute the perpetrators of sexual violence in poor and war-torn countries where victims typically have poor access to forensic tools.
The new swab will allow victims to recover genetic evidence following a sexual assault, without the need for access to proper medical care or forensic examinations. This will enable victims to test themselves for the first time.

Latest tool that helped lead Charleston police to home invasion, sex assault suspect: a vacuum

…Chief Greg Mullen of the Charleston Police Department said the victim could tell only that her assailant was a black man. Detectives had no other clues at the investigation’s start.
But the special wet vacuum, which the city recently received through a $50,000 federal grant under the Violence Against Women Act, changed that, he said. The M-Vac system collects trace amounts of DNA and other evidence when traditional methods might fail…