Category Archives: New ID Technologies

Plano PD’s new DNA testing tool weeds out bad samples, cuts wait time for results from months to minutes

The Plano Police Department is testing a new tool that’s expected to help solve crimes faster and save money on forensic testing.
Due to the backlog at crime labs across the country, wait times for DNA results in criminal investigations can be crippling. And there’s no guarantee that items sent for testing will return usable DNA profiles. As much as half of all evidence submitted to crime labs yields no DNA at all.

Police, county use rapid DNA system to confirm suspect in Carlisle homicide

Police are crediting the cooperation of citizens, law enforcement and aid from new technology in catching the man they say shot and killed 35-year-old Rhyhiem Hodge Sunday during a robbery in Carlisle.

The Future of the CYP2D6 Molecular Autopsy using Tramadol-Exposed Individuals

Molecular autopsy describes the use of genetic data to aid in determining cause and/or manner of death in situations where traditional medico-legal autopsy is undetermined. Seminal papers in this field have used genetic variation in the cytochrome p450 family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) locus to classify four main metabolizer phenotypes: poor, intermediate, extensive, and ultrarapid.

New DNA swab to combat sexual violence in war zones

Scientists have created a self-testing DNA swab that could make it much easier to prosecute the perpetrators of sexual violence in poor and war-torn countries where victims typically have poor access to forensic tools.
The new swab will allow victims to recover genetic evidence following a sexual assault, without the need for access to proper medical care or forensic examinations. This will enable victims to test themselves for the first time.

Latest tool that helped lead Charleston police to home invasion, sex assault suspect: a vacuum

…Chief Greg Mullen of the Charleston Police Department said the victim could tell only that her assailant was a black man. Detectives had no other clues at the investigation’s start.
But the special wet vacuum, which the city recently received through a $50,000 federal grant under the Violence Against Women Act, changed that, he said. The M-Vac system collects trace amounts of DNA and other evidence when traditional methods might fail…

Ultrasensitive DNA quantification by light scattering

Traces of biomolecules such as DNA can be detected with a new “dynamic” technique based on the observation of association and dissociation events of gold nanoparticles. If the desired DNA sequence is present, it can reversibly bind two nanoparticles together. This can be detected in real time through a change in light scattering. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this method differentiates true signals from noise and can detect deviations of individual bases.

DNA Evidence Collected By M-Vac Helps Solve 40 Year Old Cold Case

Salt Lake City, Utah (PRWEB) June 29, 2017
On December 4th, 1977 Sharon Schollmeyers was a 16 year old girl living in an apartment in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. Unfortunately, there was a murderous stalker who was dangerously close and it proved to be deadly for her. According to court documents the next day Sharon was found by her mother naked in her bathtub in 6 inches of water with a gag in her mouth and a halter-top around her head as a blindfold. She had been strangled, suffocated and her death was ruled a homicide.

Forensic Scientists Recover Human DNA from Mosquitoes

Human blood extracted from mosquitoes remains viable for DNA analysis up to two days after feeding, new research shows.

Murder Case Highlights Importance Of Conviction Review

On Thursday, Hartford Judge Julia D. Dewey vacated the conviction of Alfred Swinton for the murder of Carla Terry in 1991 and ordered a new trial. Swinton was convicted in 2001 and sentenced to 60 years in prison.
What makes the judge’s decision unusual is that it was supported by State’s Attorney Gail Hardy. The decision is the result, in part, of the increased sophistication of DNA testing in recent years. But it also reflects the willingness of prosecutors in Connecticut to undertake what amounts to a conviction integrity review when presented with substantial evidence of a possible wrongful conviction.

Epigenetics and Forensics

In the future, it may be possible to create a profile of a criminal suspect from a drop of blood that provides details of their age, diet, smoking status, the drugs they have consumed, the polluted environment they live in, and even if they have a traumatic history of abuse.

State police to get DNA test done in 90 mins, the FBI way

NAGPUR: Maharashtra police would soon be able to match US’s Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in getting DNA profiling, fingerprinting and other tests. The DNA test results would not only be available within 90 minutes but also at the crime scene, if needed.

Standard DNA Testing Can’t Differentiate Between Identical Twins.

Telling one identical twin from another poses problems for police. And it goes beyond appearances.
That’s because DNA profiling may be the gold standard for bringing criminals to justice, but when it comes to identical twins, standard testing can’t tell the difference.
So when crime scene DNA showed a match to a suspect in two rape cases in Boston in 2004, it showed a match to his twin brother as well.
Now, a Suffolk County prosecutor is trying to persuade a state judge to make her court the first in the country to admit a new forensic test that points to one of the twins — and not the other.

How Machine Learning Is Changing Crime-Solving Tactics

dna-computerModern forensic DNA analyses are crucial to crime scene investigations; however the interpretation of the DNA profiles can be complex. Two researchers from the Forensics and National Security Sciences Institute (FNSSI) have turned to computer technology to assist complicated profile interpretation, specifically when it comes to samples containing DNA from multiple people.

Forensic DNA profiling might be about to take a big leap forward. Are we ready?

evidence-collectionPicture the scene. A detective is addressing her team:
“The DNA test results are in. We’re looking for a white male suspect, 34–37 years old, born in the summer in a temperate climate. He’s used cocaine in the past. His mother smoked, but he doesn’t. He drinks heavily, like his Dad. We’re seeing high stress levels, and looking at the air pollution markers, let’s start looking downtown, probably near a major intersection”.

Genedrive scores US army coup with DNA-testing deal

helix10A small British company has clinched a rare deal with the US armed forces, providing them with millions of pounds of kit to test for biological warfare agents. The US Department of Defense has now begun field trials of DNA analysis equipment from Genedrive.