Category Archives: New ID Technologies

Wisconsin Crime Labs use new DNA analysis program

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) – Starting this year, Wisconsin State Crime Labs are using software that untangles the web of DNA left at a crime scene.

California Becomes First State Accredited For New Technology Which Will Make It Easier To Test DNA Exposed To Harsh Conditions

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra [yesterday] announced a DNA technology advancement that will enable the California Department of Justice…to increase its ability to successfully identify unknown persons. The Department is the first accredited state crime lab in North America to begin fully sequencing mitochondrial DNA, which makes it easier to test degraded evidence samples that have been subjected to harsh environmental conditions. This advancement is particularly important for being able to process DNA involving unknown human remains and help families find closure regarding loved ones who have gone missing.

FDLE, Leon County Sheriff’s Office unveil nation’s first automated rapid DNA collection

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement along with the Leon County Sheriff’s Office announced Wednesday a new process being used at the Leon County Detention Facility.

Woodlands-Based Biotech Company is Helping Solve America’s Cold Cases

Othram uses advanced DNA sequencing and proprietary software to enable human identification applications from degraded and often scare forensic DNA evidence. The company has built the first and only private laboratory to apply the power of modern genome sequencing in a forensic environment.

Forensic Nucleic Acid Analysis of Uncultivatable Microbes: New Method Expand the Microbial Toolkit

The molecular characterization of microorganisms is achieved by microbial culturing techniques which yield enough nucleic acids for amplification and genetic analysis.

DNA From Newborn Bloodspot Biobank Helped Crack 2007 Infant Death Cold Case

YOLO COUNTY (CBS13) — Paul Perez, 57, is accused of killing five of his own infants.
Perez is being held without bail after pleading not guilty to five charges of premeditated, first-degree murder and with five enhancements of lying in wait, and torture. Officials say stored baby DNA helped identify Perez as the father in this cold case criminal investigation.

Ancient Proteins Reveal 6,000-year-old Ring Was Made From Deer Antler or Bone

Nearly 6,000 years ago, in what’s now Denmark, a Neolithic crafter fashioned a ring from a piece of deer antler or bone. During the process, or soon after, the piece broke in two. It was apparently dropped — perhaps discarded in frustration — near other items, including a wooden spear that was also broken.
And there the ring waited, over time buried by debris and dirt, and eventually submerged beneath the sea.

NYS Sheriffs’ Association unveils new crime fighting initiative using synthetic DNA

The New York State Sheriffs’ Association unveiled a new statewide crime prevention program on Thursday aimed at using synthetic forensic technology to thwart crime and help with criminal investigations.

Betty Pat Gatliff, forensic sculptor who put a face to John Does, dies at 89

The bones usually arrived by mail, a stream of anonymous packages bearing unknown remains. Sent from police departments, coroners and medical examiners across the country, they landed on the Oklahoma doorstep of Betty Pat Gatliff, a forensic sculptor who pioneered a new method for reconstructing faces, turning an avocation into her life’s work.

Why China Is the Brave New World of Editing Human DNA

The headline-making births in November 2018 of the world’s first gene-edited babies (twin girls) was unsurprising in one way: The scientist involved was from China. As part of its effort to dominate scientific spheres including biotechnology, China has taken the lead in testing uses of Crispr, a tool newly available to researchers enabling them to alter DNA codes simply and inexpensively. Chinese scientists were the first to test Crispr in monkey embryos, in non-viable human embryos, in adult humans, and now in creating designer babies. Now China is confronting accusations that its regulatory system is overlooking the ethical considerations and medical risks.

Police use DNA to create composite of suspected killer in 2006 Springfield slayings

Fairfax County police have turned to a cutting-edge technique utilizing DNA to create composite images of a man they believe carried out the killings of two Springfield women months apart in 2006.
The images released Wednesday use the man’s genetic material to construct facial images that approximate what he may have looked like at ages 25, 40 and 55. DNA collected from the scenes of the crimes linked the same unidentified man to the slayings of Marion Marshall and Marion Newman.

China Uses DNA to Map Faces, With Help From the West

TUMXUK, China — In a dusty city in the Xinjiang region on China’s western frontier, the authorities are testing the rules of science.

Ultrasensitive protein method lets scientists ID someone from a single strand of hair

A new forensic technique could have criminals—and some prosecutors—tearing their hair out: Researchers have developed a method they say can identify a person from as little as 1 centimeter of a single strand of hair—and that is eight times more sensitive than similar protein analysis techniques. If the new method ever makes it into the courtroom, it could greatly expand the ability to identify the people at the scene of a crime.

How massively parallel sequencing platforms are revolutionizing forensic analysis

In this expert interview, we hear from Prof. Bobby LaRue about improved depth of coverage and high-power discrimination in mixed DNA analysis

Police arrest alleged ‘Potomac River Rapist’ linked to attacks in Maryland and Georgetown

New advances in genetic testing allowed police to have the genetic samples collected at crime scenes compared with people who submitted their DNA to explore their family lineage. That led police to five relatives, and detectives narrowed the list to a suspect who had lived in Maryland at the time of the attacks and worked as a landscaper.