Category Archives: DNA Legislation

‘Francine’s Law’ for missing persons signed by Gov. Stitt

Legislation that changes the way missing persons cases are handled in Oklahoma has been signed into law.

Experts Call for Making DNA Testing Mandatory in Violent Crimes

New Delhi, Delhi, India: In a compelling debate on forensic DNA technology’s role in fighting crime, organised at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club–South Asia, forensic, legal, and policy experts attributed the rise in crimes against women in India to more reporting of cases rather than an extraordinary spike in violence.

“Francine’s Law” Heads to the Governor

“The bill is named for Francine Frost, of Tulsa. Her family never quit looking for her after she went missing in 1981. More than three and a half decades later, remains that had been discovered two years after she was abducted were finally identified as hers, thanks to the determination of Francine’s family and the NamUs database,” Daniels said. “If this measure had been the law years ago, her case could have been solved sooner. I want to thank the Frost family for their strength and perseverance in helping bring this legislation forward.”

Bill seeks to prohibit using DNA databases to solve crime

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — After police used a new technique to arrest a man suspected of being the Golden State Killer, a Maryland legislator proposed a law that would prohibit use of a familial DNA database for the purpose of crime-solving.
House bill 30, sponsored by Delegate Charles Sydnor, D-Baltimore County, seeks to prohibit searches of consumer genealogical databases for the purpose of identifying an offender in connection with a crime through their biological relative’s DNA samples.

Woman whose daughter was raped, murdered pursues law changes in NC

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (WNCN) — The man accused in a string of sexual assaults known as the Ramsey Street Rapes will face a judge on Tuesday. DNA testing and genetic genealogy led police to charge Darold Wayne Bowden in the case.
One woman is pushing to change DNA collection laws our state. She’s changed legislation in North Carolina before and she’s determined to do it again.

Harper Angel files bill giving victims of rape online access to track sexual assault kits

FRANKFORT – The 2019 Legislative Session opened with Senator Denise Harper Angel continuing her work for victims of sexual assault — specifically on the testing of sexual assault forensic kits. After successfully passing two related bills, the senator has turned her focus to the online tracking of rape kits.

Delaware DNA Collection Bill Is Ready

The bill amends section 4713 of Title 29 of the Delaware Code to require buccal swab DNA sampling of persons arrested for (instead of convicted of) certain violent felonies. It also requires blood DNA sampling of persons convicted of violent felonies,incarcerated in the Delaware correctional facilities.

Exonerated man pitches senate on forensic science bill

RICHMOND, Va. — A bill to help people wrongfully convicted by flawed forensic science is under consideration in Virginia, helped by a man who spent more than three decades in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

Maryland bill would further curb police use of DNA databases

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Maryland’s legislature is considering expanding restrictions on how law enforcement uses DNA databases to identify criminal suspects.

Phoenix PD Give Details On Sex Assault Investigation At Hacienda

In a statement on Tuesday, Hacienda said it welcomed the development in the ongoing police investigation. The company said that they themselves had consulted attorneys to determine whether it would be legal for them to compel employees to undergo DNA testing or whether they could conduct voluntary DNA testing of their employees.
“We were told it would be a violation of federal law in either instance,” the company said in a statement.

Florida Circuit Court Rules DNA Evidence Produced by STRmix Analysis Is Admissible in First-Degree Murder Case

A Florida Circuit Court has ruled that evidence produced through the use of STRmix™ – the sophisticated forensic software used to resolve mixed DNA profiles previously thought to be too complex to interpret – is admissible in Florida v. Reshaunte Jermaines Anglin (Case No. 2017-CF-7816-XX, Section F9), a 2016 case in which the defendant is charged with first-degree murder, robbery with a firearm, and evidence tampering.

Dramatic advances in forensics expose the need for genetic data legislation

Many people first became familiar with DNA testing through its use in the OJ Simpson murder trial in 1994. Now, 24 years later, there have been two dramatic advances in the capability of forensic genetics that mark the start of a new era.
The first is the amount of information we can predict about a person from DNA found at a crime scene, and the second is the way police can use open genealogy databases to identify people.

DNA and fingerprints data shared with other countries for first time

Gardaí will be able to share forensic evidence such as DNA profiles and fingerprints with authorities in other countries for the first time today.
Laws passed in 2015 are finally coming in to effect, meaning offenders arrested here could end up being linked to crimes outside of Ireland.

Mandatory DNA collection on felony arrests yields results

Indiana- Eight months after a law requiring state police to collect DNA samples from anyone arrested on a felony charge took effect, the policymakers behind the measure are praising what they see as positive results.

Ancestry, 23andMe and others say they will follow these rules when giving DNA data to businesses or police

Ancestry, 23andMe and other popular companies that offer genetic testing pledged on Tuesday to be upfront when they share users’ DNA data with researchers, hand it over to police or transfer it to other companies, a move aimed at addressing consumers’ mounting privacy concerns.
Under the new guidelines, the companies said they would obtain consumers’ “separate express consent” before turning over their individual genetic information to businesses and other third parties, including insurers. They also said they would disclose the number of law-enforcement requests they receive each year.