Category Archives: Cold Cases

Could new national DNA database provide a break in one of Alberta’s most gruesome cold cases?

Septic Tank Sam lies in an unmarked grave in an Edmonton cemetery, his identity no less a mystery than when his tortured body was pulled from a rural septic tank on a spring day in 1977.
But 40 years after Sam met his grisly end, cold case investigators hope a new national DNA database will give fresh leads on who he was — and who killed him.
Set to launch in 2018, the RCMP’s national children and missing persons unidentified remains database will allow investigators to compare DNA from unidentified human remains to DNA from living relatives who offer a sample in hopes of finding answers about a missing loved one.

Skeletal Remains Found in Search For Natalee Holloway’s Body Do Not Belong to Her

Human bone fragments found in Aruba that were suspected to be those of Natalee Holloway do not belong to the dead American teenager.
Dr. Jason Kolowski, a forensic scientist leading the testing and interpretation of the results, told Oxygen Monday that tests on the fragments came back negative. The fragments did not belong to Natalee, whose body has never been found.

DNA Solves Mystery of ‘America’s 1st Serial Killer’ H.H. Holmes

The mystery of America’s first serial killer, H.H. Holmes, has finally been solved. The NBC10 Investigators revealed new attempts to discover if Holmes somehow escaped his death sentence. His grave was dug up in Yeadon, Pennsylvania. NBC10 investigative reporter George Spencer shows us that we now know for certain where Holmes’ story came to an end.

Continued funding needed for DNA lab

Reduced federal funding for the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification comes with serious national implications — especially for smaller law enforcement agencies.
The National Institute of Justice has diverted grant funding that used to go to labs analyzing DNA to identify missing people and the unidentified dead.

DNA from headless torso matches missing journalist

COPENHAGEN — DNA from a headless torso found washed up on an island near Copenhagen matches that of missing Swedish journalist Kim Wall, Danish police said Wednesday.
At a press conference, chief investigator Jens Møller Jensen said police had linked the victim to the torso with DNA obtained from her toothbrush and hairbrush. Blood found on the submarine was also a match for Wall, he said.

DNA ‘billion to one’ evidence identifies guilty man for brutal killing 40 years ago

North Wales- Breakthroughs in forensic testing and the “foresight” of scientists has finally helped convict the real killer of a 15-year-old schoolgirl more than 40 years ago.

Bodies Found In Swiss Glacier Believed To Be Couple Missing Since 1942

On a summer day in August 1942, Swiss couple Marcelin and Francine Dumoulin set off on foot in the Alps. They never returned.
Now, two bodies have been discovered in a shrinking glacier by a worker from a ski lift company, according to Swiss media, and they are believed to be the couple who disappeared some 75 years ago.

Mystery Solved: Boy killed in Georgetown finally identified after 96 years

GEORGETOWN – After 96 years, a boy killed by a train in Georgetown is finally going home.
Todd Matthews, director of case management and communication for NamUs, a national centralized repository and resource for missing persons and unidentified decedent records, identified the boy as Frank A. Haynes of Bronston. Matthews identified the boy Thursday near his grave in Georgetown Cemetery.
Haynes died April 1, 1921, when he was struck in the head by a train in Georgetown. At the time, officials tried to identify him and buried him before he was positively identified. He was buried in Georgetown Cemetery with the tombstone that simply reads, “Some Mother’s Boy.” He was about 19.

Evidence in Gardner Museum thefts that might bear DNA is missing

The trail had been cold for years when the FBI announced in 2010 that it had sent crime scene evidence from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum to its lab for retesting, hoping advances in DNA analysis would identify the thieves who stole $500 million worth of masterpieces.
But behind the scenes, federal investigators searching for a break in the world’s largest art theft were stymied by another mystery. The duct tape and handcuffs that the thieves had used to restrain the museum’s two security guards — evidence that might, even 27 years after the crime, retain traces of DNA — had disappeared.

State says it will do DNA tests on 274 Green Bay rape kits; testing could begin next week

GREEN BAY – An email that appeared in a detective’s mailbox last week brought good news for the city’s sexual-assault victims — and the police who work on their behalf.
The missive brought news Green Bay police had been awaiting for weeks: They could finally send more than 200 rape-evidence kits to a Madison laboratory for testing.

Ruling on April Kauffman DNA sample being kept quiet

MAYS LANDING — A decision by Judge Bernard DeLury on whether to order a DNA buccal sample, or cheek swab, be obtained from endocrinologist Dr. James Kauffman in his wife’s murder case is being kept sealed.
The physician was married to radio host and veterans advocate April Kauffman, who was found shot to death in her Linwood home May 10, 2012.

Saliva helps detectives solve double murder case

LOS ANGELES — Detectives say saliva helped solve a multiple murder case that eluded investigators for six years in Southern California.
CBS Los Angeles reports police arrested 32-year-old Geovanni Borjas on Tuesday in connection with the rapes and murders of 22-year-old Bree’Anza Guzman and 17-year-old Michelle Lozano.

Ten years on, DNA on Coke can leads to arrest over $200,000 jewelry heist

A discarded can of Coca-Cola left behind from a low level break-in more than a decade ago helped Australian police catch the criminal behind a notorious robbery of more than $200,000 worth of jewelry from the shop in the city of Shepparton, in northern Victoria.

Garda told State lab lacks resources for full DNA analysis

The Garda have been told that full DNA tests of crime scenes will not be carried out in the case of “volume crimes”, such as burglary or car theft, due to limited resources.
Ireland’s first DNA database was established a year ago and has been widely praised for linking crimes to offenders on more than 600 occasions, including in 350 burglaries. The database now contains some 10,000 profiles from suspects, convicted criminals and sex offenders – a figure that is increasing by about 1,000 every month.

Priest’s DNA does not match profile from cold-case murder of nun

(CNN)A DNA sample taken from the exhumed remains of former priest A. Joseph Maskell does not match the DNA from the murder scene of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik, according to Baltimore County Police.
Police announced on Wednesday that they had received results from Bode Cellmark Forensics laboratory in Lorton, Virginia, excluding Maskell as a contributor to a DNA profile developed from evidence taken in 1970 from the scene in Maryland where the decomposed body of Cesnik was found by a father and son out hunting. The 26-year-old nun had been missing for nearly two months.