Virginia attorneys are getting a crash course in DNA testing to help them in the courtroom

It can be used to connect multiple victims to one attacker, like in the case of a man accused of raping six women from Virginia Beach to Williamsburg.
It can uphold juries’ findings from decades ago, like when a test confirmed the attacker in a 1974 Virginia Beach rape case.
It can exonerate innocent people and convict guilty ones — if the lawyers fighting to defend or prosecute grasp the science behind it.
But not all lawyers fully understand what happens when criminal DNA evidence is tested and how forensic scientists come to their conclusions. And not understanding the science could lead to trouble in the courtroom.