Monthly Archives: February 2019

‘Making a Murderer’ Subject Steven Avery Wins Right to Appeal in Wisconsin Court

“Making a Murderer” subject Steven Avery will have his case re-examined by a Wisconsin court, his lawyer announced this week.

China drafts rules on biotech after gene-editing scandal

BEIJING — China has unveiled draft regulations on gene editing and other potentially risky biomedical technologies after a Chinese scientist’s claim of helping to create gene-edited babies roiled the global science community.
Under the proposed measures released Tuesday, technology involving gene editing, gene transfer and gene regulation would be categorized as “high-risk” and managed by the health department of the State Council, China’s Cabinet.

DNA Helps Uncover Suspect Behind 1970s South Lake Tahoe Murder Cases

El Dorado County DA Vern Pierson said their two families were “frozen in time,” suffering for years with no arrests, no suspects and no information — until now.
“It wouldn’t have happened without this technology,” Gaines said.

A long handshake can spread your DNA to objects you didn’t touch

BALTIMORE — A 10-second handshake could transfer a person’s DNA to an object that the person never touched.
In handshaking experiments, people who never picked up a knife became the major source of DNA on the handle about 7 percent of the time, forensic scientist Cynthia Cale reported February 21 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. That DNA was transferred to the knife when the person’s handshaking partner grasped the handle.

Scientists Successfully Double the DNA Alphabet

Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers has expanded the genetic alphabet by creating synthetic DNA that uses eight letters rather than four, according to a new study published in the journal Science. The new manufactured structure is called “hachimoji DNA,” from the Japanese words for “eight” and letter.”

He won $21 million after 39 years wrongly locked up. He has one cop to thank for freeing him.

“While no amount of money can make up for what happened to Mr. Coley, settling this case is the right thing to do for Mr. Coley and our community,” City Manager Eric Levitt said in a statement.

‘I’m a prince’: After years of searching for family history, a pastor discovers royal ties to Africa

It was about 4 a.m. when his phone buzzed with a message from far away. He read it once, twice, three times before he woke his sleeping wife to tell her the news.
“I’m a prince,” he whispered as she blinked herself awake. “A prince.”

Inside Maine crime lab that helped catch suspected Alaska cold case killer

AUGUSTA, Maine —The Maine State Crime Lab played a critical role in the recent arrest of a Maine man in connection with a 26-year-old cold case killing in Alaska.
The lab processed a cheek swab from Steve Downs and uploaded the results to a state and federal database known as the Combined DNA Index System.

Police revived a 1973 murder case by live-tweeting a girl’s last day. Now, a DNA match has led to an arrest.

On the day Linda Ann O’Keefe died, it was a cooler-than-normal July morning in Newport Beach, Calif. The brown-haired, blue-eyed 11-year-old got a ride to summer school — about half a mile away — but had to walk home in the afternoon.
It was July 6, 1973, a Friday. When O’Keefe didn’t return home right away, there was little concern at first. But when night fell and her whereabouts were still unknown, her parents called police and desperately combed the neighborhood, to no avail.

Bill seeks to prohibit using DNA databases to solve crime

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — After police used a new technique to arrest a man suspected of being the Golden State Killer, a Maryland legislator proposed a law that would prohibit use of a familial DNA database for the purpose of crime-solving.
House bill 30, sponsored by Delegate Charles Sydnor, D-Baltimore County, seeks to prohibit searches of consumer genealogical databases for the purpose of identifying an offender in connection with a crime through their biological relative’s DNA samples.

Woman whose daughter was raped, murdered pursues law changes in NC

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (WNCN) — The man accused in a string of sexual assaults known as the Ramsey Street Rapes will face a judge on Tuesday. DNA testing and genetic genealogy led police to charge Darold Wayne Bowden in the case.
One woman is pushing to change DNA collection laws our state. She’s changed legislation in North Carolina before and she’s determined to do it again.

The Lab Discovering DNA in Old Books

Artifacts have genetic material hidden inside, which can help scientists understand the past.

A suspected killer eluded capture for 25 years. Then investigators got his aunt’s DNA.

The April 1993 slaying of Sophie Sergie, an Alaska Native, was one of the state’s most notorious cold cases until Friday, when authorities announced that DNA genealogical mapping helped triangulate a genetic match with Steven Downs, 44, a nurse in Auburn, Maine.

Vietnamese sisters reunited in USA after 44 years

During the fall of Saigon, the two sisters and their mother were set to be airlifted out of Saigon before the North Vietnamese captured it. However, 2-year-old Rose wandered off from her family. Their mother frantically looked for the younger sister to no avail.
In the end, she had to make the tough decision to depart without her younger daughter.

Authorities plead for help identifying a human FOOT inside a shoe that washed up on Canadian beach – the 15th time it has happened in just a decade

British Columbia Coroners Service said in a statement on Monday that the foot was discovered still in its shoe on the coast of West Vancouver in September.
DNA testing found no match with the owner and known missing persons, but an evaluation of its bone structure of the foot led a specialist to believe that it belonged to a male under the age of 50.