New state police facilities planned in Fort Wayne, Lowell

INDIANAPOLIS- Officials are moving ahead with plans to build two new Indiana State Police facilities in the northern part of the state.
The State Budget Committee has approved spending $29.5 million on the projects in Fort Wayne and the Lake County town of Lowell in northwestern Indiana.

Were Colorado girls strangled? Father’s lawyers requested DNA swabs from children’s necks.

The two young Colorado girls who, along with their mother, were killed this past week may have been strangled before their bodies were dumped in an oil well, according to a court document.
A motion filed Friday by attorneys defending Christopher Watts, who investigators believe killed his pregnant wife and daughters, asks that DNA samples be taken from the children’s necks. The document cites an expert who argued that DNA would still be present on the bodies — even though they had been submerged in crude oil for four days before they were found — but that evidence would be lost once the autopsies were performed.

Dover Air Force Base to Play Role in Identifying Korean War Remains

Dr. Tim McMahon, the director of DNA operations for the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, said the process may be time-consuming but ultimately helps bring closure to families of Korean War soldiers who didn’t return home.
“What people need to realize is that we never give up,” he said, noting the agency has a 92 percent success rate in cases using mitochondrial DNA to make identifications.

Under the Microscope – Sara Katsanis and Jen Wagner

As the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy unfolded in Spring-Summer 2018, so too did a barrage of stories around migrant children being separated from their parents, and then mandates to re-unify them by judge-ordered deadlines. Atop the chaos were calls for DNA testing to screen migrants for trafficking, offers from genomics companies to donate tests and reagents, and the announcement of DNA as a tool to reunify families. As legislators, civil liberties advocates, geneticists, ethicists, and attorneys got involved, the media sprang into action to translate for the public the convoluted history of the use of DNA in immigration.

Mandatory DNA collection on felony arrests yields results

Indiana- Eight months after a law requiring state police to collect DNA samples from anyone arrested on a felony charge took effect, the policymakers behind the measure are praising what they see as positive results.

Indiana family receives dog tag of Korean War Army medic

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – The lone military identification tag that North Korea provided with 55 boxes of human remains last month belonged to Master Sgt. Charles H. McDaniel, an Army medic from Indiana who was killed with Chinese soldiers in November 1950.
On Wednesday, the Army handed McDaniel’s slightly corroded dog tag to his sons, Charles Jr. and Larry, who were so young at the time that they have little memory of their father.

‘Golden State Killer’: New Charge Links Alleged Murderer to 1970s Crime Spree

On Monday, authorities charged alleged Golden State Killer Joseph DeAngelo with the 1975 murder of a college professor in Visalia, California, while the alleged serial killer was still employed as a police officer. The murder of Claude Snelling is the 13th murder DeAngelo has been accused of thus far, and his earliest yet; he’s also accused of committing nearly 50 rapes between northern and southern California from the mid-1970s to 1986, and evading law enforcement for over 40 years.

DNA links Alexandria man to five sexual assaults since 2016, detective testifies

In the Dupont Circle area incident, which occurred three days later, police said the female victim was also approached from behind and sexually assaulted in the 1500 block of P Street NW.
In Georgetown, two incidents occurred, with one at 10:30 p.m.on Sept. 5, 2016, in the 1200 block of Potomac Street NW, and another about 8:15 p.m. on Oct. 26, 2016, in the 1600 block of 33rd Street NW, police said.
Prosecutors charged three of the incidents as misdemeanors and one as first-degree sexual assault.
“The forensic evidence establishes a common profile of all four assaults and the fifth assault in Virginia,” McKenna said.

Nevada inmate linked to 1984 hammer killing cold cases in Colorado

A Nevada inmate who was convicted of attacking a couple with an ax handle is now linked to the 1984 killings of four people who were beaten with a hammer in two separate attacks in suburban Denver, authorities said.

Czech Priest Killed by Communist Regime ID’d by DNA, Before Beatification

During a holy Mass on the third Sunday of Advent, on Dec. 11, 1949, in the Church of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary in Číhošť southeast of Prague, a miracle was reported.
The half-meter iron crucifix on the main altar above the tabernacle was said to have moved on its own several times—and 19 parishioners said they saw it, reporting it to the parish priest, Josef Toufar. Toufar dutifully reported to the regime’s Communist State Security Service.

Under the Microscope – Sarah Dingle

DNA analysis is a powerful tool for researchers, scientists and law enforcement. But in the everyday lives of people across the globe, affordable access to DNA testing has brought about a seismic shift. For the first time, donor conceived people can find their biological fathers, mothers or siblings. Donor conception has exploded in the last three and a half decades, but around the world it faces little regulation. Fertility clinics public and private have operated without limits on the numbers of children created from individual donors, without health checks, and largely with impunity.

DNA testing crucial to identifying remains in unmarked graves in Sugar Land

The questions now are: Will these prisoners ever be identified, and are these century-old remains linked to the present day? Experts say the answer may lie in specialized DNA testing.

NIST Interlaboratory Studies Involving DNA Mixtures (MIX05 and MIX13): Variation Observed and Lessons Learned

Highlights
•Results from two interlaboratory studies, NIST MIX05 and MIX13, are described

•In the 2005 NIST MIX05 study, 69 laboratories interpreted data in the form of electropherograms of two-person DNA mixtures representing four different mock sexual assault cases with different contributor ratio

•In the 2013 NIST MIX13 study,108 laboratories interpreted electropherogram data for five different case scenarios involving two, three, or four contributors, with some of the contributors potentially related.

•This paper describes the design of these studies, the variations observed among laboratory results, and lessons learned.

Indonesia’s pygmies didn’t descend from hobbits, DNA analysis suggests

Rampasasa pygmies residing near a cave on Flores that previously yielded small-bodied hobbit fossils inherited DNA from Neandertals and Denisovans but not from any other now-extinct hominid, scientists say, an international team reports in the Aug. 3 Science. The finding provides genetic backup for a fossil-based argument portraying these controversial Stone Age hominids as a separate species, Homo floresiensis, not small-bodied Homo sapiens that could have represented ancestors of Rampasasa people.

DNA-testing company 23andMe signed a $300 million deal with a drug giant. Here are the other private ‘third parties’ that genetics companies share your data with.

Perhaps you didn’t intend for that spit sample you shipped off to be used for research on antacids. But that could be what happens with some of the data that genetics-testing companies like Ancestry, 23andMe, and Helix have collected from billions of customers and stored in their databases.